«

»

Nov 24

Operation Christmas Child: A Story of Simple Gifts {Book Review & Giveaway}

When I was a teenager my family discovered Operation Christmas Child. I immediately loved their mission and looked forward to participating each year. As a mother with kiddos I still taking part and building shoeboxes for them.

Although I’ve been involved with OCC for quite awhile and I knew their basic mission, I never knew how it came about, the early struggles they faced or the impossibilities that God overcame. I didn’t know any of these stories until now.

OCC

Franklin Graham’s new book “Operation Christmas Child: A Story of Simple Gifts”, takes you back to the very beginning of OCC, behind the scenes and to the moment our shoeboxes are placed in a child’s hands. Throughout this mission’s amazing book you’ll find stories from children that were recipients of our boxes. You’ll be given a snapshot of the moment they received you gift, their thoughts as it was handed to them, and as they touched each item we prayerfully selected.

1993

If you’re wondering how Operation Christmas Child began and where they came from to get to 100 million+ shoeboxes in 20 years, you’ll want to put this book on your to read list.

Should you find yourself wanting to connect with a child who received a shoebox, maybe even your shoebox, then you’ll want to add this to your must read book list.

Franklin’s new book is a wonderful selection for Christmas reading. Jesus said love is the greatest of all, and the love distributed in and with these boxes is beautifully shared within it’s pages.

You have a chance to win your own copy by entering the giveaway below.

If you just can’t wait until the giveaway is over, then you can head over here to grab your copy now.

Should be interested with more information (including a video) on this book directly from OCC, simply scroll down below the Rafflecopter form.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

OCC Web Banners

 disclaimer2

From the first phone call, Operation Christmas Child recounts the people and circumstances that helped build the global Christmas project. The book follows shoebox gifts all across the globe from countries plagued by poverty, disease and natural disaster to war-torn countries including Bosnia, Kosovo, Rwanda, Russia and Sudan. Readers encounter the harrowing childhood experiences of shoebox gift recipients and experience the transforming power of a simple gift.

 

“Gypsy children in Northern Romania are not allowed to go to school until they can provide their own supplies. We’ve done many distributions among the Gypsy people and this one of the greatest delights they receive: school supplies. Children do want to learn, they do want to go to school. Mehi is such a child. When he opened his box and found paper, pencils, and markers, he ran through the village to his mother and said, ‘I have been given the best box in the whole village.’ He ran back to the organizers and shouted, nais tuke (‘Thank You!). Mehi shouted. “Now I can go to school.” – Franklin Graham

“Kosovo had been ripped apart. When we arrived at a battered school to host a shoebox distribution, we were escorted to a classroom filled with children waiting patiently. The windows in the school had been blown out and the children shivered from bone-chilling temperatures. When the gifts were passed out, my eye caught a boy sitting at a desk. He was the only child that didn’t have a coat on – not even a jacket or sweater. His body was quivering and his lips were blue. He examined the box, lifting the lid slightly and then putting it back down. Puzzled, I walked over to check it out. At first glance, the box did not appear to have any toys, or anything else that would excite a kid – that is, until I pulled a T-shirt off the top. Underneath was a fleece-lined leather bomber jacket. The boy’s eyes doubled in size as I shook it out and helped him put it on – a perfect fit! Every class had been given shoeboxes day, but in this one room, the only boy without a coat was given a box with a coat. We don’t know what’s in these boxes; there is no way we can orchestrate something like this. But God can.” –Franklin Graham

 

mysiggie

The Complete Blog Planner

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

CommentLuv badge